“YOU ARE A DOG” Actor Olu Jacob Recount Experience with White Lady

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At a time most immigrants of African origin were having difficulty building a career or getting decent jobs, Jacobs was able to make it to the British art scene with relative ease. Looking back at those days, he attributed it to good fortune.

“Providence must have had a hand in it. I think good luck was following me everywhere I went. Back then, to become an actor in England, you must be able to have an equity card. The card was issued by the actors’ union in that country. To get the card, you must have a job. And to get a job, you must have an agent, ” he said.

But life in Britain was not entirely smooth for Jacobs. Although his acting career flourished and he was opportune to appear in some productions that also featured some of the best actors and actresses in the world, there were challenges. One of them was racism.
“I was a victim of racism all the time. You felt it in the way the people looked at you and in their attitude toward you. But you could not do anything about it. I could not take somebody to court for that,” the actor said.

Recalling an incident that occurred in the first year of his stay in London, he added, “A white woman once called me a dog. She had a vacant room for rent. But when I approached her, she asked if I didn’t see the ‘No dogs’ sign on her door. Before I could respond, she said that a dog was better than me and then slammed the door in my face. I felt so bad that I almost decided to return to Nigeria.” Driven by patriotism and the desire to contribute to the growth of the arts and culture sector, Jacobs returned to Nigeria, 20 years later. He has been very active in the film industry.

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